BookBlast Estates | Classics by women writers

By BookBlast Recommends

By BookBlast Recommends

On the Wilder Shores of Love: A Bohemian Life

Lesley Blanch and Georgia de Chamberet

£10.99 £10.22

THE SPECTATOR: “Lesley Blanch was incapable of writing boringly or badly” COUNTRY LIFE: “Lesley Blanch in her own words – always interesting, always flirtatiously alive, always passionate” AUSTRALIAN FINANCIAL REVIEW: “A flamboyant and iconic writer who mixed travel memoir, scholarship and romance in a passionate, heady cocktail”

Journey into the Mind's Eye

Lesley Blanch

£12.99 £12.08

PHILIP ZIEGLER: “If you are interested in Russia – if you are interested in love – this haunting book is one to read and re-read. A masterpiece” SPECTATOR: “One of the finest books about Russia . . . one of the best travel books of its generation”

Far to Go and Many to Love: People and Places

Lesley Blanch

£25.00 £23.25

COUNTRY LIFE: “This new collection of her early journalism, biographical essays and traveller’s tales adds a whole new dimension to [Lesley Blanch’s] adventurous and romantic life . . . In this eccentric and fascinating book, she also discovers ‘the wilder shores of shopping’, and is as good company on the page as she must have been in the alleyways of Bukhara.”

The Wilder Shores Of Love

Lesley Blanch

£8.99 £8.36

WASHINGTON POST BOOK WORLD: “Love, wanderlust, faraway places – all that Romance implies – make up this make up this delicious book” THE TIMES: “Four variations on the theme of the nineteenth century woman who turns to the East for her adventurous life and love. They are, indeed, an odd quartet, well selected for the parallelism and contrast, each one in a measure freakish, enterprising, legendary and fully deserving Miss Blanch’s lively and expressive portraiture”

Round the World in Eighty Dishes

Lesley Blanch

£14.00 £13.02

ELIZABETH DAVID: “Russia, Afghanistan, Turkey, America, Egypt, Romania and Bulgaria are just some of the countries where this adventurous and inquisitive traveller has investigated the cooking pots and enjoyed – or otherwise – the hospitality of the locals. An incurable romantic, Miss Blanch invests the food she describes with the aura of exoticism”