Naked Eye publications

By Naked Eye Publishing

By Naked Eye Publishing

All of our current books are available here. For more information visit our main website nakedeyepublishing.co.uk.

Nothing but words

Jean Stevens

£6.99

The poems in Jean Stevens' latest collection revel in words: the joy of them; the work of finding the ones that say exactly what we mean; our use of them to 'manage the nothingness'.

True Life Nude

Sue Vickerman

£11.99

A Small Life and Two Small Lives are the first two parts of Suki’s life-story. At the opening of this final part of the trilogy Suki has escaped to Berlin to try and pick up the threads of her former seventeen-year relationship with Ilka. Part III of Suki the life-model's fictional autobiography.

Suki Illuminated

£9.99

Photographs of Suki the life-model by Bel. The booklet is part of a celebration of the Suki project which includes books, events, blogs and audio visual recordings and productions. Bel and Suki are fictional characters created by Sue Vickerman and Mike Kilyon.

Speak to the Earth

£8.99

The poems in this collection by Jean Stevens revel in words: the joy of them; the work of finding the ones that say exactly what we mean; our use of them to 'manage the nothingness'.

Kick-off: The start of spectator sports

David Pendleton

£8.99

Kick-off charts and analyses the experience of Bradford in relation to the national development of sport in the modern city and how spectator sport, in particular, helped shape personal and civic identities in a burgeoning industrial community.

Two Small Lives

£11.99

Suki, struggling writer, still earning her keep working as a model for artists, continues her quest for literary success while battling with self-doubt and loneliness, in this second part of her autobiographical trilogy.

Driving in the Dark

£8.99

This is a collection of poems with a large emotional and tonal range embracing love and loss, grief and joy, elegy and celebration, and moves easily from the lyrical to the colloquial, from the moving to the witty, and gives expression to the experiences that colour our lives.

Adventus

Sue Vickerman

£7.50

These twenty-five poems are perennials but may serve as daily readings starting from 1st December. They reflect on past times; on lives lived; on endings of years and of relationships; on beginnings, anxieties, hopes and an uncertain future.

Shag

£6.99

These are poems with strong, straight-talking narratives punctuated by keenly observed birds amidst the bleak land and seascapes of northern Britain. This collection of poems by Arts Council (UK) award-winning writer Sue Vickerman is about relationships illustrated by that sometimes harsh world that is 'nature'.

The distance between us

Jean Harrison

£9.99

Jean Harrison was an accomplished writer whose poems were rewarded with prizes and commendations and achieved placements on prestigious shortlists as well as publication in very many UK literary magazines. Since her debut poetry collection in 2008, Jean has had a second volume of poems and two novels published, all by Cinnamon Press, and a pamphlet-sized collection, The Tilt, by Wayleaves Press. Upon graduation from Oxford, Jean qualified as a teacher, a career which took her to Kent, Warwick, Ghana, Leeds, Birmingham, Watford and Exeter, before her retirement to Settle. In 2003 Jean was a founder member of Settle Sessions. Based at the Folly, this organisation of poets arranges workshops and regular readings where poets with national reputations are invited to perform alongside local poets. Jean died in February 2020 having all but completed the manuscript of this book. This posthumous collection serves as a memorial to her. The proceeds from this book will be used to maintain the Contemporary Poetry Library at The Folly, Settle, which was founded by the donation to the Museum of North Craven Life of Jean Harrison’s extensive personal collection.

You're not dying

Kathrin Schmidt

£14.99

"Helene Wesendahl wakes from a post-aneuryism coma paralysed, speechless and devoid of memory. With each re-learned movement, remembered word and returned fragment of forgotten biography, a life comes to light that she scarcely recognises, confronting her with a strange woman who was once herself. Through the awakening heroine’s eyes, we observe her own body (which seems to lead a life of its own as it laboriously undergoes rehabilitation), her fellow-patients, nurses and doctors, the reactions of a complicated family, and the sacrificial commitment of her husband. Helene’s crisis deepens with the gradual realisation that, owing to a passion for a mysterious woman, she was intending to leave this man who now cares so much …" In 2002, halfway through her award-winning career as a writer, Kathrin Schmidt had a stroke and lost her language. You’re not dying is a tale of recovery based on true experience, all the more astonishing for its stylistically dazzling linguistic facility. ‘Kathrin Schmidt is back. Rejoice!’ Wrote Vladimir Balzer in Die Welt. The difficult experience of illness becomes added to Schmidt’s hallmark themes of love, the body, gender and genealogy, historiography and memory. In 2009 You’re not dying was the triumphant winner of the German Book Prize, pipping to the post the recent Nobel Prize-winner Hertha Muller, who was also shortlisted. Schmidt’s writing career is littered with multiple prestigious prizes for both her poetry and prose. Schmidt’s writings are framed by her politics. She co-edited a feminist journal in East Berlin in the early years of the united Germany, and represented the United Left faction at round-table discussions at the time of reunification. Before becoming a writer she trained as a psychologist. • translated into 13 languages – now, at last, into English! • voted Best Book by German radio & TV platform SWR

Somewhere a blind child

Ion Cristofor

£8.99

Ion Cristofor’s poetry leaves the door open to possibilities. There is always more beneath the surface of these poems. He “discovers the world as he discovers the poem”, which he creates “obsessively” in an imaginary laboratory. Sensuality and spirituality coexist in a recurring natural world, giving rise to a curious mix of cynicism and purity. This serves the basis of the compassion which both qualifies and sets him apart as a member of the “80s Generation”: Romania’s leading literary current of confessional poets who endured the harshest part of the communist regime and participated in the 1989 Revolution. A self-possessed seeker who builds upon his most authentic self with unwavering direction, Ion Cristofor is a poet to welcome into the English language with open arms. Ion Cristofor (b.1952) is a poet, literary critic, and translator. A member of “Echinox”, one of Romania’s leading literary circles, and former editor of its afferent journal, he holds a PhD in Romanian literature. He has published over twenty books of poetry and essays, some of which have been translated into Italian, German, French, and Catalan. In addition to having received many awards in his native Romania, Cristofor has received the University of Freiburg’s Publication Prize and has been awarded an honorary diploma of membership from the Romanian-Israeli Cultural Centre in Haifa, Israel. Authors he has translated into Romanian include Tahashi Arima, Alain Petre, Alain Jadot, Paul Emond, Philippe Jones, and Liliane Wouters. He has translated, coordinated, and edited anthologies of poetry from Japan and Tunisia

It's over. Don't go there.

Kathrin Schmidt

£14.99

These are tales of small, damaged lives that unfold towards sometimes deadly ends. Desolate or downright funny, often they are about women: single and lonely, or ordinary and kind, or who neglect their children, or whose children abuse them. Immigrants, the homeless, the sexually abused, the suicidal - these and other aliens populate a 'left behind' region where a sense of powerlessness holds sway. Gay, straight, or transitioning, most of Schmidt's characters are jobless, and mostly middle-aged, or else very old: a senile paedophile grandmother; another whose stinking belches accompany the wartime trauma she hands down to her offspring, for they too must suffer. Kathrin Schmidt draws us alongside people limited or trapped by circumstances imposed on them, whether by the socialist regime or the one that came after, her stories set variously in the twilight hour of the German Democratic Republic and the post-1989 decade when the GDR was subsumed into the Germany of today. All is not bleak, for adversity generates human kindness and heart-warming responses, even love affairs and comedy. But Schmidt makes her point.

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