The Great Pyramid Hoax: The Conspiracy to Conceal the True History of Ancient Egypt

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Description

Despite millennia of fame, the origins of the Great Pyramid of Giza are shrouded in mystery. Believed to be the tomb of an Egyptian king, even though no remains have ever been found, its construction date of roughly 2550 BCE is tied to only one piece of evidence: the crudely painted marks within the pyramid’s hidden chambers that refer to the 4th Dynasty king Khufu, discovered in 1837 by Colonel Howard Vyse and his team.Using evidence from the time of the discovery of these “quarry marks” - including surveys, facsimile drawings and Vyse’s private field notes - along with high definition photos of the actual marks, Scott Creighton reveals how and why the marks were faked. Analyzing Vyse’s private diary, he reveals Vyse’s forgery instructions to his two assistants, Raven and Hill, and what the anachronistic sign should have been. He examines recent chemical analysis of the marks along with the eye-witness testimony of Humphries Brewer, who worked with Vyse at Giza in 1837 and saw forgery take place. Exploring Vyse’s background, including his electoral fraud to become a member of the British Parliament, he explains why he was driven to perpetrate a fraud inside the Great Pyramid. Creighton’s study strikes down one of the most fundamental assertions of orthodox Egyptologists and reopens long-standing questions about the Great Pyramid’s true age, who really built it, and why.

Product Details

Price
£12.99  £12.34
Publisher
Inner Traditions Bear and Company
Publish Date
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781591437895
BIC Categories:

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